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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
education. so that gets us how do we deal with educational site. i do want to go into that. then you come to the question of how do you come how do we make a more effective and priority. i don't know how it happened, but we stuck with the history stuck with a history in a is that was very excellent education. and we. and were regarded as everybody basically is back to the ford model. you have kindergarten through 12, then you go to college, and if you haven't achieved that you are really worthless, right? so that's not working. i think we have to go back to origin and say let's make it more flexible and let's also bring -- you asked early on where is opportunity. i think that is the most natural opportunity for cooperation to, in fact, it's happening already. we have a number of programs on the way they successfully. there's a big challenge there, and that is a challenge that most people today that goes when education system don't even understand what a manufacturing job looks like. the image that they have been manufactured you is you come in early in the month with a white shirt and you
% and it will essentially be cut close to happen the next decade. we are talking about education programs and health programs, including nih research. we are talking about infrastructure. we are talking about key domestic discretionary programs that are so important for the lives of the vast majority of the american people. as the president subsequently yesterday, the debt ceiling essentially must not be used as a weapon. it essentially takes on an is the basic full faith and credit of the united states of america. the president has made so clear what would be at stake if that were to happen. i just believe that it is so critical that that not occurred. you know, i have been through these battles for many decades. i don't remember anyone essentially saying we should go over the cliff. the consequences would be, i think, shamanic and potentially cataclysmic. for the republicans that say let's do it, i think i would be a mistake with foreseeable consequences. the federal reserve has said the responsible physician is we should not forget. >> the president says he's not going to talk about the debt ceil
interesting, and that's education. well-educated work force will be competitive across the world. that is the most critical investment. again, a role for the federal government, certainly a role for states and local governments, but a role for the american society that cannot be ignored. research education. and you drew it very, very correctly, and that is the manufacturing that comes from that. manufacturing matters, and how do you do? you need to be in front of it. and when you talk about the research and manufacturing technology, spot on. that is the third critical investment. the fourth one we talked about here, and that is infrastructure. these are four of the critical investments that we need to make as a society. some of that falls on individual companies encouraged by a research tax credit or encouraged by buy america in different ways, we encourage the tax policy. we did that. it was a democratic proposal. we did it three years ago and continued it and continued it in the recent fiscal cliff legislation where we provided 100% write-off for capital investment. that was fr
, culture, art, and education. their patriotism is quiet, but deep. their values sustain our national life. now, i have used the words "they'' and "their'' in speaking of these heroes. i could say "you'' and "your,'' because i'm addressing the heroes of whom i speak -- you, the citizens of this blessed land. your dreams, your hopes, your goals are going to be the dreams, the hopes, and the goals of this administration, so help me god. we shall reflect the compassion that is so much a part of your makeup. how can we love our country and not love our countrymen, and loving them, reach out a hand when they fall, heal them when they're sick, and provide opportunity to make them self- sufficient so they will be equal in fact and not just in theory? can we solve the problems confronting us? well, the answer is an unequivocal and emphatic "yes.'' to paraphrase winston churchill, i did not take the oath i've just taken with the intention of presiding over the dissolution of the world's strongest economy. in the days ahead i will propose removing the roadblocks that have slowed our economy and redu
. for instance, yesterday the president talked about education. education polls really well among women. so they know what they're doing when they play the outside game. >> well said. thank you so much. nia-malika henderson, welcome back to "hardball." glenn thrush. beginning to sound like a pack of moon shiners. remember them, chasing the revenuers out of town? you're watching "hardball," the place for politics. i just served my mother-in-law your chicken noodle soup but she loved it so much... i told her it was homemade. everyone tells a little white lie now and then. but now she wants my recipe [ clears his throat ] [ softly ] she's right behind me isn't she? [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup.
five? top three? caller code jobs, education, and for the end of the war. -- caller: jobs, education, for the war to end. host: let's hear the president speaking on the economy, social security, and medicare. caller: we the people -- [video clip] >> many barely make it. we believe that america's prosperity must rest upon the broad shoulders of a rising middle class. we know that america thrives when every person confined independence. on the wages of honest labor, liberating families from the brink of hardship. we are true to our creed, when a little girl born into bleakest poverty has the same chances to succeed as anyone else because she is an american, free and equal, not just in the eyes of god, but in our own eyes. we the people still believe that every citizen deserves a measure of security and dignity. we must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of health care and reduce the size of our deficits. but we reject the belief that america must choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future. [applause]
educational activities to visiting school groups during the summer months which is the only time outer island is actually open. the connecticut state university web site is clear that, quote, all schools and civic associations or other parties interested in participating in jealal activities on outer island, must, underline must, have prior approval. while the fish and wildlife service has no staff on outer island, the university uses interns to supervise the educational program. and occasional person may stop and have lunch. but if you want to visit, you must coordinate your visit with the university and not the fish and wildlife service. in addition, the university received a $250,000 grant from the long island sound fund. last friday, members of my staff met with representatives of the fish and wildlife service. the service has confirmed that they do not charge the university for what amounts to almost exclusive use of the island. furthermore, the service did not provide at any time, any analysis or breakdown on how they will spend $9.8 million of our taxpayer money. in fact, the only info
. and their choice of words. for instance, the president talked about education. education polls well amongst women. they know what they're doing when they play the outside game. >> well said. thank you so much nia-malika henderson, welcome back to "hardball." and glenn thrush. >>> remember them chasing the revenuers out of town? you're watching "hardball," the place for politics. aww man. [ male announcer ] returns are easy with free pickup from the u.s. postal service. we'll even drop off boxes if you need them. visit usps.com pay, print, and have it picked up for free. any time of year. ♪ nice sweater. thank you. ♪
against a ban is white men with no college education. a college educated men and women, as well as nonwhites and young people, they all support a ban. america is dividing as the demographics in this country shift. it's time for the silent majority in this country to be heard. this civil war rhetoric needs to stop before it turns to be even more dangerous. i am a life-long hunter. now, we all give our resume when we start talking about guns. and this is one of the things that does bother me. why do we do that? well, we do that because we want to qualify that hey, i'm not a nut, and i believe in the second amendment. but i really do think we can have some sensible gun laws in this country. attitude, society changes. attitudes in society change over the years. we don't stay the same on a lot of issues. we move forward. now, i'm not concerned that my guns are going to be taken away. and i would venture to say that of all the conservative hosts that you just saw there, i have probably shot more deer and pheasants than any of those suckers. this is not about tyranny. this is not about
are going, in terms of the percentage of gdp, what we spend on education, what we spend on health research, what we spend on so many necessary programs in this country is going to go down. the trend line is already there. what the republicans are essentially saying is to push it further. have further consequences in terms of health research. does that make sense? do the american people want that? no. we have to have balance. the problem within the republican conference of the house is there is too much imbalance/ host: do you agree with this editorial -- guest: no one is suggesting relying only on taxation of the very wealthy. that is a sham target. no one is saying that. but let me point out, if we look at what has happened to middle- income families -- and i mentioned that there now dipping into their retirement on a massive basis. in 2010, the top 1% received over 90% of the income growth. that represents basically a very -- i represent basically a very middle-class district. i know the struggle to stay above water, in some cases. all we're asking for is balance. host: on the spending s
and spelled it out. healthcare, energy, education. he has done healthcare. that's fairly radical. 18% of the economy. now he is talking about energy. the second thing. if you took an outsider and said what is the main issue of our time? it's the crisis of the entitlement state. it's insolvent. it's advanced in europe where they are out of money and we are going to get there in a couple of years. there is nothing in the speech about that. not even recognition there is a crisis. tall programs of the 20th century were enacted with the life expectancy is 62. medical technology is eventually non-existent. he said i'll take that, defend that and expanding the entitlement by adding obamacare he said i'll do energy that he spoke about a month after the first inauguration. with climate change and continue on the road in green energy stuff. he wants to create what he thinks he can in washington, new industry, string of solyndras until the end of time. expanding entitlement state in crisis. there is no change from who he was in 2009. he never has to be re-elected so he can be utterly unbound an
by disasters, are entitled to important educational protections and services including transportation to stay in the same school. public schools in new york, new jersey, connecticut are working tirelessly to support uninterrupted education of displaced children through the program. yet these schools face significant unexpected costs associated with the increased number of homeless students. congress has appropriated supplemental funds to help defer the costs associated with these increase -- these increases from past disasters. mr. chairman, if i might, give than the bill before us today does not contain direct funding for the program, is it your understanding that the intentions of the department of health and human services and the department of education work with the states of new york, new jersey, connecticut to assist the school districts affected by superstorm sandy, to access funds under the social services block grant to support the education of students displaced by the storm, including the transportation, counseling and supplies? i yield to the gentleman. mr. rogers: i thank the ge
. >> is their something that you want to have? >> i would offer the question of education and training as a potential lesson here is an excellent one. it is one of the significant lessons from fukushima if. we find there are very often training lessons learned from any number of occurrences throughout the industry. in this particular case when you think about the magnitude of the event and the such a vision that the operators of this particular nuclear site found themselves in, it was unprecedented in any of their in education and training and one of the lessons is to take that idea of a magnitude event that exceeds what we generally designed to our sites and begin to both educate what defense and depth can provide and turn to the coping strategies in a situation like that if i would be -- that may allow it level of resilience that may not have been designed into the site in the first place. this was remarkable in its scope. there was some courageous operators that remained at the watch at fukushima attending to mitigate what happened to them. obviously in retrospect additional education and training
their children in a classroom with a teacher engaging in the reason they are there, education. we should not ask our teachers to be armed. they have come out against this in a multitude of venues. i find it just almost ludicrous that the answer to gun violence is more guns, that is not the solution that the american people want, and we, frankly, you know, deserve to live in communities that are gun violence-free. jenna: eric, quick final thought? >> the polls just don't bear that out. gallop showed last month that more americans want armed teachers and principals than want gun restrictions. even the chiefs of police that have been polled and surveyed on this. 79% of them think that people should be able to carry firearms concealed. so it's just not true to say that the american people don't want this. we live in a culture -- jenna: as a journalist i can say a lot of numbers deserve a lot more context than we can provide for them today. >> can i mention one thing. the gallop poll was proven to be ineffective and categorically wrong in a number of areas in the fall elections. i'm not sure we want
dangers of military action against iran. i think that's where we are now. >> we're now in a cambodian re-education camp. >> i'm not sure i'd use that analogy, but i think they're trying to basically make hagel be in line with the absolute conventional wisdom in congress, which is that you say military action is on the table, which is okay, but you don't say that military action could have very dangerous consequences. >> yeah. let me go to joan on this. joan, and i watched this group. we're both doves. and i think i just am very skeptical of any wars, these bite-sized wars. what we confront with iran will be hardly bite-sized. not a neat war where we do the job and live with it. in saying these are dangerous propositions, it seems to me evidence of sanity. >> it's absolutely sanity. he's also called the defense budget bloated. they'll probably get him to walk that back even though it's true. he called for an earlier exit from afghanistan than perhaps the president would have backed at the time that he said it. although things have changed since hagel said it. so it's a terrifically important piece
issues to disparity in education and health care, would also be put on the agenda, and those would also be addressed. certainly a lot of that has not happened, and there is certainly a disappointment across large sectors of the black community. but it is also realistic also a sense of the constraint that the president has had. and it is not just about the president. it is also bought congress, about state houses, and about governors. there is a broader political strategy that has to enfold to achieve some of the things that people hoped would happen when president obama was elected. host: barbara, anything to add to that? guest: it is often hard to maintain the kind of levels of excitement from the first inaugural to the second, and that applies to any president, particularly this one because the expectations were so high. i compared it to a second marriage. hard to rekindle that sparked sometimes. perhaps it is the more like renewing the vows. the american people ought to fall in love again with the president. they want to have that hope and expectation. there are lots of people here.
was studying to build a career just like mom. >> i absolutely couldn't wait to get a degree in education and start teaching. >> when sara came to you and said, i want to be a teacher -- >> i was thrilled. when your child wants to follow in your good footsteps, you're thrilled. >> reporter: and right out of college, sara scored her dream job, teaching english here at dixie heights high in kentucky. she was just 23. >> i wanted those kids to love school, because school should be a good experience. >> reporter: but sara was a different kind of teacher. it wasn't just her age or personality. it was that flashy weekend job. >> it made me more marketable from the boys' standpoint because on monday they could come in and talk about the game, because i was there. >> reporter: but the girls? >> the girls were very jealous if any of their boyfriends were in my class. >> hard to ignore the obvious. a lot of people see the skimpy outfits, the sexy poses and a lot of people see the cheerleaders as sex objects. as a mom, does that bother you? >> i just really never thought of it that way. she's my kid
educational protections and services including transportation to stay in the same school. public schools in new york, new jersey, connecticut are working tirelessly to support uninterrupted education of displaced children through the program. yet these schools face significant unexpected costs associated with the increased number of homeless students. congress has appropriated supplemental funds to help defer the costs associated with these increase -- these increases from past disasters. mr. chairman, if i might, give than the bill before us today does not contain direct funding for the program, is it your understanding that the intentions of the department of health and human services and the department of education work with the states of new york, new jersey, connecticut to assist the school districts affected by superstorm sandy, to access funds under the social services block grant to support the education of students displaced by the storm, including the transportation, counseling and supplies? i yield to the gentleman. mr. rogers: i thank the gentleman for yielding. yes. that is
and going to ask if the secession could have been prevented. he is talking about the military education, the acceptance that has to go down but he feels uneasy about the constitution and some of the causes and he's already beginning to look at the session the and he certainly is in january before and he says in his letter not a moral point of view but the implication of savages from africa making slaves of them would be the best we could do for them but the question as political bearings virginia and north carolina from the sleeves of the market and the value of the property of the confederacy were such importations prohibited would be more than it would be in the southern confederacy which would admit of no such competition and we already have the plotting for the secession before he's there. estimate i don't think the secession could ever have been actually. estimate your absolutely right it's not going to change what we agree on and that is they would not have accepted anyone but a proslavery democrat at that moment. they didn't even accept the popular democrat. stephen douglass to s
other innocent children and devoted educators who had so much left to give. for the men and women in big cities and small towns who fall victim to senseless violence each and every day. for all the americans who are counting on us to keep them safe from harm. let's do the right thing. let's do the right thing for them and for this country that we love so much. thank you. let's sign these orders. any of you guys left handed? are you? >> president's now signing 23 executive actions as he's calling them. 23 separate orders that he's giving right now that do not require congressional authorization to go forward. i guess that one signature represents all 23 of the executive actions that he signed. he's now giving a hug to these young kids who wrote letters to the president, asking him to take these kinds of actions, to do something to prevent another, another disaster at an elementary school or a high school or a college campus that the president was talking about. he accepted the recommendations of the vice president joe biden. there you see the vice president with the kids as well. let's ta
's presidency. i was listening to one of the speakers. they seem educated. it is imperative that obama touches on more than one issue, rather it is gun control, abortion, etc. in regard to gun control, i live in arizona now. there is not an issue with getting a gun. i do not understand why we are making an attempt to take guns post the newtown issue. if it is a thing of mental health, why are we not addressing that? ronald reagan closed all of the mental health institutions. why aren't we looking into reestablishing them? versus taking one of our basic civil liberties away. guest: absolutely a central aspect to this -- both parties agree in the case of these high- profile shootings that sometimes the problem is with the state of the shooter. we saw that in colorado. in and he, you look back on these instances and it turns out there were warning lines and that the mental health system, the educational system did not have any way of taking these people in and channeling them in some kind of help for themselves. how do you deal with that? how do you fund these programs? all of those are complicat
education, health care and government performance. so if you didn't get a copy when you came in, there are copies out in the hallway outside the auditorium. in this particular session, we're going to discuss how our political leaderrers can better -- leaders can better address the problems that we face. in particular we're going to look at ways that we can get congress, the white house and federal agencies to perform at a higher level. what are the new ideas to change the manner in which government functions? are there responsibilities that can be foreverred to other levels of -- transferred to other levels of government, the private sector or nongovernmental organizations? to help us understand the benefits and barriers to government performance, we have brought together an outstanding set of speakers. to my immediate right is phil knight who's the chairman and cofounder of nike incorp.ed. -- incorporated. in 1964 phil and his former university of oregon track coach, bill bowerman, founded what was then called blue ribbon sports which was later named nike after the greek winged
of the country, this includes bringing in high tech services, health care, education and so on. places like the university of michigan in ann arbor are a tremendous resource and people trying to develop high-tech businesses so it is an opportunity to see that america has a powerful industrial base there are some positive things to look at. one of the key positives that i already made reference to his housing. as you know, house prices in the u.s. fell about 30% for the first time, since the 2007, 2006, we are starting to see increases in production and rising house prices and how that will affect household wealth. that is one positive factor that is going to help us out and help us to have a better year in 2013 and in 2014. a few other things that are positive is that state and local governments, which have been in contractionary mode because of the loss of everything. they wanted to check on the economy that they have been for the last two years. the energy industry is looking much stronger. consumers are more optimistic than the university of michigan publishes the index of consumer senti
an amendment to formally abolish slavery and it took the supreme court and the board of education vs. brown case to apolish jim crow, the tell-child of slavery. and a great stain on this country's history. thanks to roe v. wade, women have a fundamental right to make decisions about their own bodies, a right that continues to be threatened by this congress. and while the constitution grants great freedoms, the courts recognize that they come with reasonable limitations. the first amendment gives us freedom of speech but doesn't allow us to yell fire in a theater. and the second amendment, while it gives you the right to bear arms, has limitations as well. you can't carry a gun in an airplane or in a courtroom. and we need to remember that. so just reading the constitution is one thing but understanding is another. i hope we'll understand it and live it and see that we have a more perfect union. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from oregon seek recognition? without objection, the gentleman from
's important to try to push it. the other piece we haven't talked about is the education reform and the drawdown overseas. >> well, there was a big idea, i think, in the speech today, and that was equality. that's what this speech was about. >> let's check in with wolf. >> the president is about to sign a proclamation. he's also about to nominate several members of his cabinet. let's see if we can listen in. >> all set? all right. i'm proclaiming peace, honor and good will towards men. >> amen. >> i'm sending a few nominations up. mr. charles headinger for defense, mr. john kerry, secretary of state, and mr. [ inaudible ] >> there you go. thank you very much, everybody. >> thank you. [ applause ] >> so the president, once again, formally nominating members of his cabinet. chuck hagel to be secretary of defense, john kerry to be secretary of state, john brent. let's listen in to see what else he's saying. >> that's yours. >> so they have a little -- a few laughs, a little official business, the nomination of cabinet members, signing a proclamation. dana bash, what's going to happ
among us, we must act now, for grace, for the 25 other innocent children and devoted educators who had so much left to give, for the men and women in big cities and small towns who fall victims to senseless violence each and every day, for all the americans who are counting on us to keep them safe from harm. let's do the right thing. let's do the right thing for them and for this country that we love so much. thank you. [ applause ] we'll go sign these orders. >> we watch as the president puts his signature to these executive orders. >> there we go. [ applause ] >> some emotional remarks by the president, acknowledging more than once the children behind him who wrote him letters after the newtown tragedy, parents in attendance, lost children from the newtown tragedy, 20 kids killed 33 days ago. david gregory, moderator of "meet the press" has been watching with us. david, after this event and when, if you want to call it business of washington gets down to business, where will this all stand now? >> the politics are so difficult, brian, that even the images of children behind the presi
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)